Tag Archives: reading

Perfect Happiness is….

…reading a book you love, glancing at the time and realizing that you still have lots of reading time left.

teabook

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Why Reading Is Great for Your Amazing Brain

  • exercises many parts of the brain and strengthens neural linkages
  • develops/deepens capacity to empathize
  • helps with healing of mental and emotional disorders as well as brain injuries

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‘Tis the Season…

reading

 

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The Benefits of Reading Together

    1. A stronger relationship with you. As your child grows older, he’ll be on the move—playing, running, and constantly exploring his environment. Snuggling up with a book lets the two of you slow down and recaptures that sweet, cuddly time you enjoyed when he was a baby. Instead of being seen as a chore or a task, reading will become a nurturing activity that will bring the two of you closer together.
    2. Academic excellence. One of the primary benefits of reading to toddlers and preschoolers is a higher aptitude for learning in general. Numerous studies have shown that students who are exposed to reading before preschool are more likely to do well in all facets of formal education. After all, if a student struggles to put together words and sentences, how can he be expected to grasp the math, science, and social concepts he’ll be presented with when he begins elementary school?
    3. Basic speech skills. Throughout toddlerhood and preschool, your child is learning critical language and enunciation skills. By listening to you read One Fish Two Fish Red Fish Blue Fish, your child is reinforcing the basic sounds that form language. “Pretend reading”—when a toddler pages through a book with squeals and jabbers of delight—is a very important pre-literacy activity. As a preschooler, your child will likely begin sounding out words on his own.
    4. The basics of how to read a book. Children aren’t born with an innate knowledge that text is read from left to right, or that the words on a page are separate from the images. Essential pre-reading skills like these are among the major benefits of early reading.
    5. Better communication skills. When you spend time reading to toddlers, they’ll be much more likely to express themselves and relate to others in a healthy way. By witnessing the interactions between the characters in the books you read, as well as the contact with you during story time, your child is gaining valuable communication skills.
    6. Mastery of language. Early reading for toddlers has been linked to a better grasp of the fundamentals of language as they approach school age.
    7. More logical thinking skills. Another illustration of the importance of reading to children is their ability to grasp abstract concepts, apply logic in various scenarios, recognize cause and effect, and utilize good judgment. As your toddler or preschooler begins to relate the scenarios in books to what’s happening in his own world, he’ll become more excited about the stories you share.
    8. Acclamation to new experiences. As your child approaches a major developmental milestone or a potentially stressful experience, sharing a relevant story is a great way to help ease the transition. For instance, if your little one is nervous about starting preschool, reading a story dealing with this topic shows her that her anxiety is normal.
    9. Enhanced concentration and discipline. Toddlers may initially squirm and become distracted during story time, but eventually they’ll learn to stay put for the duration of the book. Along with reading comprehension comes a stronger self-discipline, longer attention span, and better memory retention, all of which will serve your child well when she enters school.
    10. The knowledge that reading is fun! Early reading for toddlers helps them view books as an indulgence, not a chore. Kids who are exposed to reading are much more likely to choose books over video games, television, and other forms of entertainment as they grow older.

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The Three Little Pigs, read by Christopher Walken

Christopher Walken reading a children’s classic…relatively amusing…sorry for the quality.

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Local Book Bits

Big Little Book Sale: June 2, 2012; 8:00 a.m. – 1:00 p.m.

2821 8th Line Road,
Metcalfe

Gently used Adult and Children’s books, sorted by genre and some popular authors. Steps from the Metcalfe Farmer’s Market. The sale is in support of the Live and Learn Resource Centre, part of the registered charity Rural Family Connections.

For more info call 613-821-2899 or info@ruralfamilyconnections.ca

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Lunchtime Poetry Reading: June 19, 2012; 12:00 p.m.

 Main Branch of the Ottawa Public Library

A lunchtime poetry reading. John Lee and Sydney Lea, an American and Canadian poet, will read some of their work. Readings will be followed by Q&A.

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Tween Girls’ Book Club: June 27, 2012; 1:30 p.m.
St-Laurent Branch of the Ottawa Public Library
The Tween Book Club is a fun way to read great new books and hang out with friends at the same time! Ages 10-13. Register by calling 613-748-1531 ext. 221.
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Teen Boys Book Club: June 27, 2012; 2:45 p.m.
St-Laurent Branch of the Ottawa Public Library
Want to meet guys your age and discuss books, movies and games while munching on brownies? Then, why not join our book club? Ages 13+ Register by calling 613-748-1531 ext. 221.
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Kanata Writer’s Group: August 22, 2012; 7:00 p.m.
Hazeldean Branch of the Ottawa Public Library
The Kanata Writers’ Group encourages the art of literary composition. Only the June 13th meeting will be held in the Lower Level Activity Room at the Glen Cairn Community Centre. Visit thekanatawritersgroup.blogspot.com for more information.


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Here Comes the Festival of Trees!

It’s actually not about trees (much to my surprise). It’s an annual festival, organized by the Ontario Library Organization that encourages reading across the province and recognizes Canadian children’s books authors and illustrators. It’s also a great opportunity to meet some of your favourite authors and illustrators and to participate in games and win prizes.

I had a wonderful opportunity to speak with Meredith Tutching, Program Coordinator, from her office in Toronto:

What is the Festival of Trees about?

The Festival is the culmination of the Forest of Reading Awards. We have 7 trees that are in our forest and 5 of them are geared towards kids. So, these are the kids programs that are wrapping up. There are a quarter of a million kids from across the province that read Canadian books that were on our short list, ending in the month of April. And the winners are being announced tomorrow and Wednesday and 12 of those  nominated authors are coming to Ottawa.

How do you choose the books that are nominated?

The books are submitted by publishers from across the country (they’re all Canadian publishers). We have teachers and librarians who have selection experience and they read all of the books that are sent in to submission and they short list it to down to 10.

The Festival in Ottawa will focus on the Silver Birch and Red Maple Programs? What are they about?

The Silver Birch is geared towards kids that are in grades 3 to 6 and the Red Maple is for kids in grades 7 and 8. And, so, in the Silver Birch there are 3 lists: a fiction list, a non-fiction list and a list called the express list, which is geared towards the grade 3 or 4 reader and the more reluctant reader and it’s a mixture of fiction and non-fiction. And Red Maple is just a list of fiction this year. And, so, that’s 40 books among the 4 programs.

When did the Festival start?

The Festival is in it’s 5th year. We did have small ceremonies before. The Program started in 1993 with just the Silver Birch. And it was a small Program and it’s just grown. And different people have come to us from across the province to add more trees to our forest. And, so, then we added Red Maple and it’s sort of grown and we have White Pine and Bruce Spruce and all sorts of different trees. We, now, have a French program and this year, in October, we’re going to be launching a French picture book program. 

And, finally, can you tell us about the nominated authors, who are going to be present at the Festival?

We have over 80 of the authors coming to Toronto over the 2 days and we have 12 of the authors coming to Ottawa. None of them know if they’re short-listed or if they’re winners. So, it will be a big surprise to them tomorrow and Wednesday. And, hopefully, there will be some winners among those who are going to Ottawa.

Each author will be doing a workshop and an autographing session. The authors and illustrators coming to Ottawa this year are: Philipa Dowding, Natalie Hyde, Jan Andrews, Anna Kerz, Rachna Gilmore, Jill MacLean, Patrick Bowman, Sharon E. McKay, Bill Slavin, Romi Caron, Susin Nielsen, Anna Ziegler.

The Ottawa Festival of Trees is taking place on May 17th, from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. at the Fieldhouse, Carleton University. Tickets are $10 +HST and can be purchased on-line. For more details, you can click here.

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